LITEMPO

The piece is an installation which deals with documents on Mexico from different American intelligence agencies and declassified by the USA between 1998 and 2003. These documents refer to –through undercover names, to the Mexican “agents” recruited by Winston Scott -CIA’s operation chief in Mexico-who between 1956 and 1969, “recruited a total of 12 agents in the highest levels of the Mexican government. His “informers” included two former Mexican presidents (1) and two men who were subsequently trialed for war crimes “.

“The code name of the CIA spy network was LITEMPO. Letters LI represented the code of the Agency for the operations in Mexico; TEMPO was the term given to a programme which, in words of a secret history of the Agency, was “a productive and effective relationship between the CIA and a select group of high rank officials in Mexico”. Started in 1960, LITEMPO served as “an extra-official channel for the exchange of select and sensitive political information each government wanted to obtain from the other, but not through the public protocol exchange.“

In the CIA files, Scott’s agents were identified with specific numbers. LITEMPO-1, for instance, was a man called Emilio Bolaños, nephew of Gustavo Díaz Ordaz, Secretary of Government and president in the 60s. Diaz Ordaz was LITEMPO-2, and thus consequently each member of LITEMPO was assigned a number “

LITEMPO “informers” were paid by the agency, payment which, in some accounts, was considered excessive according to the opinion of a senior CIA official. The documents included in the installation, refer to actions before and after October 2nd, 1968, when the students massacre occurred in Plaza de las 3 Culturas, known as Tlatelolco Massacre, still under investigation and with on-going legal procedures, which number of deaths has not been determined yet, because the bodies were disposed of.

LITEMPO is the epitome of the political machination of Latin American elites and American interests still kept in secret and impunity.

LITEMPO

The piece includes the selection of 75 LITEMPO files, focused on the massacre of the Plaza de las3 culturason October 2nd, 1968 (2 pieces).The piece is an installation which deals with documents on Mexico from different American intelligence agencies and declassified by the USA between 1998 and 2003. These documents refer to –through undercover names, to the Mexican “agents” recruited by Winston Scott -CIA’s operation chief in Mexico-who between 1956 and 1969, “recruited a total of 12 agents in the highest levels of the Mexican government. His “informers” included two former Mexican presidents (1) and two men who weresubsequently trialed for war crimes “.”The CIA’s code name for the spy network was LITEMPO.

Letters LI represented the code of the Agency for the operations in Mexico; TEMPO was the term given to a programmewhich, in words of a secret history of the Agency, was “a productive and effective relationship between the CIA and a select group of high rank officials in Mexico”(2). Startedin1960, LITEMPO “informers” were paid by the agency, payment which, in some accounts, was considered excessive according to the opinion of a senior CIA official (5). The documents included in the installation, refer to actions before and after October 2nd, 1968, when the students massacre occurred in Plaza de las3 Culturas, known as Tlatelolco Massacre, still under investigation and with on-going legal procedures, which number of deaths has not been determined yet, because the bodies were disposed of. LITEMPO is the epitome of the political machination of Latin American elites and American interests still kept in secret and impunity.

From left to right acrylic files are organized according to the amount of text until the highest censorship cross out, in a species of domino effect. Materially, it also means a degradation of the cut part: the letter cut starts, i.e., the result is blank paper without letters. This change towards the middle and in the crossing out, the blank is erased and the letters and cross outs remain.

From left to right acrylics change its visual and material qualities in the following order: 1 transparent,2 obscure filmed, 3 brilliantwhitetranslucent,4 opaque white, 5 transparent grey (cold fume), 6 opaque grey, 7 opaque black.

(1)Philip Agee blew the whistle on CIA skullduggery in the 1970’s. He is the reason why Valerie Plame’souting became an issue. Three Mexican Presidents were CIA. Philip Agee in his book CIA DIARY laid it all bare.
(2)Morley, Jefferson LITEMPO: The eyes of the CIA in Tlatelolco. (washingtonpost.com columnist and biographer of Win Scott, former CIA station chief in Mexico City.2008
(3)Id Ibid.
(4)Id Ibid
(5)Id Ibid

 

 

 

 

 

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